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2020-2021 Departmental Plan

By Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

ISSN number : 2371-8277

Catalog number : Iu90-1/15E-PDF

Publish date : March 10, 2020

Summary :

Consult this departmental plan establishing CED's priorities and expected results for 2020-2021.

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Table of Contents

  1. From the Minister
  2. From the Institutional Head
  3. Plans at a glance
  4. Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks
  5. Internal Services: planned results
  6. Spending and human resources
  7. Corporate information
  8. Supporting information on the Program Inventory
  9. Supplementary information tables
  10. Federal tax expenditures
  11. Organizational contact information
  12. Appendix: definitions
  13. Endnotes

From the Minister

It is my pleasure to present the 2020-21 Departmental Plan for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED). We are working across the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio to enhance Canada's innovation performance, improve conditions for business investments, increase Canada's share of global trade and build a fair and efficient marketplace that promotes consumer choice and competition.

We will continue to work with provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous groups, industry, stakeholders and all Canadians to deliver an economic agenda that is growing an internationally competitive, knowledge-based economy while achieving our environmental goals.

We also understand that the path to economic prosperity varies from region to region. We will continue to support economic development through the Regional Development Agencies that is responsive to the unique opportunities and challenges across the country. We will also encourage opportunities to increase trade and investment in key sectors that are economic drivers for the regions, including work that will build on the new Federal Tourism Growth Strategy.

CED will pursue its role as the local federal organization for businesses and communities in Quebec, thus contributing to the achievement of the Government's objectives and, specifically, to the renewed regional economic development framework. The Agency will foster business growth and development, notably by pursuing its support for innovation and commercialization on foreign markets. Present in all regions of Quebec and attentive to the needs of key community players, CED will continue to tailor its activities to the realities of Quebec's regions to help strengthen community economic vitality.

Through all these initiatives and more, we are continuing to deliver our commitment to fostering a dynamic and growing economy that creates jobs, opportunities and a better quality of life for all Canadians.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

The Honourable Mélanie Joly
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

From the Institutional Head

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) plays a leading role in regional economic development. Through our activities, we aim to support businesses in the realization of innovative and strategic projects that generate long-term economic growth for Canadians. The 2020-21 Departmental Plan sets out the resources and plans that will be put in place to achieve our results, in line with government priorities.

As the local federal organization for businesses and communities in Quebec, CED takes great concern to emphasize the importance of the regions and the diversity of economic realities and needs. To this end, CED has established priorities that will guide its interventions in 2020-2021. Our efforts to support business growth and development will continue to take the form of support for regional innovation ecosystems, the adoption and development of leading-edge technologies, the digitization of services, business automation, and commercialization on foreign markets.

We will also work to strengthen the economic vitality of the regions, while taking into account the unique challenges facing communities. Our 12 business offices located throughout the province will collaborate with the various levels of government, community stakeholders and regional organizations, with a view to providing equitable development opportunities for all regions.

As witnessed by the work being carried out on the ground, CED will also innovate in its ways of doing things, delivering services and meeting citizens' expectations, notably through the implementation of the Agency's digital strategy.

Now, more than ever, our planning highlights our responsible management and our commitment to a more innovative, sustainable and inclusive economy.

Enjoy your read!

Manon Brassard

Manon Brassard
Deputy Minister / President,
Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Plans at a glance

Regional economic development is dependent on business growth and community vitality. Economic development efforts that produce results for citizens share a particular approach, namely involving local communities and institutions in the design and implementation of measures tailored to their needs and focusing on sectors and technologies that allow them to distinguish themselves, both nationally and internationally.

The Quebec economy is currently thriving. However, this economic health masks certain structural issues, including gaps in productivity, investment and marketing, and a labour shortage. Significant disparities among the various regions of Quebec have also been observed, as well as a growing gap between large urban centres and more remote regions. Finally, we need to accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy and seize the related economic opportunities.

As the key federal player devoted to Quebec's economic development and drawing on its business offices located in 11 regions, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) has been tasked with supporting the regions as they address these issues. We will pursue our mission to support business growth by providing businesses with assistance and funding at various stages of their development. We will continue to invest in our communities, taking into account their unique challenges and needs and building on their strengths to help them adjust to today's economy. This commitment will include improving the economic prospects of various population groups, such as women and Indigenous peoples, through strategic and targeted investments.

As a regional development agency (RDA), CED acts as the local federal organization for businesses and communities in Quebec. CED takes care to highlight the importance of the regions and the diversity of economic realities and needs. TThe Agency is therefore able to contribute to the development of a renewed framework for regional economic development that aligns with the government's overall economic plan and takes into account the opportunities and challenges specific to communities. CED will act as a reliable resource and, when appropriate, a convener of federal departments and agencies, in order to effectively serve businesses, entrepreneurs and community organizations. CED will also ensure that it has the tools it needs to support the government's overall economic agenda.

Over the course of the coming year, we will be focusing specifically on the following three priorities.

1. Support business growth and development

Small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) are key engines of economic growth in the regions of Quebec and their vitality helps ensure equal opportunities for all. We will continue to boost business growth through our ongoing support for innovation, the adoption and development of new cutting-edge technologies, the digitization of services, and business automation. To help businesses expand and remain competitive, we will also prioritize commercialization in foreign markets.

In addition, we will foster the growth and development of regional innovation ecosystems, specifically by supporting industrial clusters and incubators and accelerators. These close-by regional players will enhance the innovative and productivity capabilities of participating business by facilitating alliances and providing assistance at key stages of their development. Our support will help businesses expand, attract international investment and integrate into global value chains.

Furthermore, to combat climate change, we will give particular consideration to projects that improve environmental performance. Examples include the selection of clean technologies to increase business productivity and competitiveness; the purchase of energy-efficient equipment; and the development and commercialization of clean technologies that enable Canadian SMEs to export their know-how to international markets, thus allowing Canada to position itself as a world leader in the field of clean technologies. We will therefore be helping to grow our economy while meeting our environmental objectives.

2. Strengthen the economic vitality of communities

Given its mandate, CED is attentive to the challenges Quebec's regions must overcome to achieve their full growth potential. We observe and understand the issues that communities are facing as they attempt to adjust to major technological, demographic, business and climate change, as well as to the growing economic gap between cities and regions. Within this context, we will provide support tailored to the needs and realities of the various regions by working together with other levels of government, community stakeholders and regional organizations such as economic development organizations and regional or sectoral tourism associations, with a view to providing all regions with equal and equitable development opportunities. We will also continue to support local economic development and to strengthen the capacity of communities to develop in a sustainable manner through the Community Futures Program (CFP).

The goal of our commitments, which stem from listening to communities and developing a close relationship with them, is to have a concrete impact on citizens and businesses, whether it be by helping to create a stronger business climate, boosting investment or creating jobs.

3. Pursuit of the Horizon 2021 initiative

In 2018-2019, we committed to being innovative in the way we do things, deliver our services and meet the expectations of the public, by implementing the Horizon 2021 initiative. We intend to continue our efforts related to the implementation of our digital strategy, the development of a culture of innovation and the enhancement of the client experience.

For more information about Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' plans, priorities and planned results, see the "Core responsibilities: planned results, planned resources, and key risks" section of this report.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section provides detailed information about CED's planned results and planned resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also includes information about the key risks associated with the achievement of these results.

Develop Quebec's economy

Description

Support economic growth and prosperity and job creation in Quebec by means of inclusive clean growth; help SMEs grow through trade and innovation; and build on competitive regional strengths.

Planning highlights

CED will work with the other five regional development agencies—within the limitations of their respective mandates—to grow Canada's economy.

To measure progress made with respect to its core responsibility, which is to Develop Quebec's economy, CED has identified three departmental results. CED's various priorities for the current year will ensure progress in terms of the achievement of the departmental results, which are nonetheless dependent on the economic context.

Departmental result 1: Quebec businesses are innovative and growing

Quebec companies need to constantly innovate, not only with their production processes, but also with the products and services they provide, in order to remain competitive and grow in the various markets. CED helps businesses become more innovative and productive and ensure a greater presence on the international stage.

CED provides ongoing funding for business projects targeting the development of new products or services, the reorganization of production processes, the adoption of state-of-the-art emerging technologies, the digitization of operations and the rollout of new business models. In 2020-2021, CED plans to set aside a minimum of $25 million for projects involving the development or adoption of clean technologies and business practices targeting clean growth. CED's aim in doing so is to help its clients improve their environmental performance. These activities on the part of CED are in line with the Government of Canada's broad objective set forth in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely to counter the impact of climate change by aiming for a target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

The 2020-2021 fiscal year will also provide an opportunity to deliver on projects carried out by world-class incubators and accelerators. These organizations are a key component of innovation ecosystems and an essential milestone in the development of promising young companies at various stages of their existence (startup, commercialization and growth).

CED will also promote the capabilities of Quebec SMEs to prime contractors with a view to maximize the industrial and technological benefits that are generated in Quebec by Government of Canada acquisition projects.

Departmental result 2: Communities are economically diversified in Quebec

Communities that diversify their economic activities have a greater chance of being more resilient in the face of economic uncertainty. To this end, CED will continue to support SMEs in all regions of Quebec and to provide funding to organizations that assist SMEs, regardless of their location in the area that they serve.

In order to promote inclusive prosperity and equality of opportunity for all, CED will pursue initiatives targeting specific groups, notably:

CED will also complete the evaluation of the CED Fast Forward Challenge, an experimental project aimed at helping young entrepreneurs launch their business projects.

Experimentation

In 2018, CED launched the CED Fast Forward Challenge, which aims to encourage innovative entrepreneurship among young engineering students and graduates.

The experimental nature of the approach is based on the use of new program delivery methods, agile project management and communication methods recently tested at CED. The Fast Forward Challenge was also designed as a pilot initiative for the application of Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+).

The Challenge was launched in November 2018. Projects were assessed by CED and a selection board on a competitive basis, according to their innovative nature, quality, commercial potential and economic benefits. The winners were announced in 2019, and the evaluation of the experiment will continue until December 2020. The entrepreneurial activities of the participants, as well as the performance of the winning businesses, will be documented over the course of the year following the announcement of the winners, to assess the impact. CED will announce the results and lessons learned in 2020-2021.

Again with a view to fostering prosperity for all, CED also supports tourism projects likely to further diversify the economy of certain regions that have low growth potential. CED is aware of the importance of tourism as a key lever of economic development for communities in transition, and as such recently renewed its support for regional and sectoral tourism associations, which work in a collaborative and coordinated manner to attract tourists from outside Quebec to various regions of the province.

CED recently updated and renewed agreements with organizations receiving funding under the Community Futures Program (CFP). These new agreements make the services of Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs) accessible to a greater number of local Quebec businesses in two ways: first, by increasing rural coverage, and secondly, by allowing all CFDCs and BDCs to provide the same line of products and services to the entire area covered. According to a recent evaluation of the CFP (December 2019)Footnote i, the CFP is being effectively implemented and continues to achieve its main objectives.

CED is also pursuing its commitment to strengthen and ensure the economic diversification of communities that have experienced an economic shock, through the continued implementation of the Lac Mégantic Economic Recovery Initiative.

Departmental result 3: Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Quebec

The presence of strong and dynamic economic ecosystems encourages the emergence of new ideas and facilitates the development of business projects. CED provides funding for business technology transfer organizations in the area of clean technologies, thus increasing the innovation potential in the regions. Innovative ideas and the startup of innovative business will enable Canadians to grow their economy and prosper, while protecting our natural heritage and the environment.

CED also continues to support many organizations whose mission is to assist SMEs at critical stages in the implementation of their business projects. Examples include: organizations linked to educational institutions that allow young graduates to develop their business projects; organizations that enable SME technology transfers; organizations that support export or commercialization projects; and organizations whose purpose is to help attract foreign direct investment.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

In line with its GBA+ Statement of Intent, CED will continue to assess changing realities and inequalities of diverse groups of people. The Agency will seek effective ways to adapt the design and delivery of its policies, programs, internal practices and client services in order to ensure inclusive outcomes for all Canadians and equal access to benefits.

United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

In carrying out its mandate, CED contributes to the achievement of sustainable development objectives with an economic dimension, as identified in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by the 193 member states of the United Nations, of which Canada is a member.

  1. Gender equality (SDG 5): Through the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES), the aim of which is to help women grow their businesses by providing access to funding, talent, networks and expertise, CED is helping women to fully and effectively participate in management roles. These activities have a positive impact on the proportion of women who own businesses or who hold management positions in Quebec.
  2. Decent work and economic growth (SDG 8): The goal of CED's regular programs is to promote steady, long-term economic growth. These programs foster business development and the economic vitality of communities. These efforts have a positive impact on businesses, their growth rate, and employment, and are reflected in the growth of GDP per capita.
  3. Industry, innovation and infrastructure (SDG 9): Through its Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program, CED makes a significant contribution in terms of promoting sustainable industrialization that benefits everyone through rational resource use and greater reliance on clean and environmentally friendly technologies and industrial processes.

Key risks

Risk 1: Ability to adjust the delivery of its programs in a changing economic environment

Considering the risk that the pursuit of the priorities and expected results of CED's economic development programs will be affected by the economic context and the various changes likely to have an effect on support for regional development and funding for businesses, CED will continue to closely monitor changes in the regional economic development context in Quebec and the intervention strategies of the main players. In concrete terms, we will analyze the impact of changes likely to affect our ability to support business development and growth in all regions of Quebec. We will maintain the regional scan and analysis capacity required for the development and implementation of specific or temporary initiatives in response to issues that arise in various regions. Finally, if necessary, an external communications strategy may be updated to reflect adjustments to CED's priorities or programs.

Risk 2: Information and technology management

Given that some of our technological solutions are reaching the end of their useful life, particularly those related to financial management, there is a risk related to the integrity of available data. In the medium term, CED plans to mitigate this risk by deploying new technological solutions to ensure data integrity, while at the same time increasing its client and financial management capabilities. In the meantime, the state of our technological solutions is being monitored on an ongoing basis. We have put controls and specific processes in place and are conducting follow-up to ensure that the integrity of our financial information is maintained.

Risk 3: Workforce management

Over the next few years, Quebec employers will face a number of challenges relating to employee recruiting and retention (e.g., retirements, labour shortages, need for specialized IT skills, change management and project management, etc.). These challenges will require an adequate management and transfer of knowledge to address the increased pressure on resources.

CED, which is also affected by this context, may not be able to recruit employees for certain routine functions or specialized skill profiles that are essential to the development of our services. To mitigate this risk, we are currently implementing innovative talent recruitment and retention strategies, including university recruitment. An inventory of at-risk positions will allow us to proactively maintain our capacity and identify new professional profiles, specifically ones relating to our digital strategy. To meet these needs, we will promote the use of employment equity groups and will develop employee versatility. Finally, we will assist our employees in order to facilitate the adoption and buy-in of our new tools and the new skills required.

Planned results for the “Develop Quebec’s economy” core responsibility
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual results 2017-18 actual results 2018-19 actual results
Quebec businesses are innovative and growing Value of Quebec goods' exports (in dollars) $91.9B March 31, 2021 $77.2B* $78.6B* $86.1B*
Value of Quebec clean technologies' exports (in dollars)** Unavailable March 31, 2021 Unavailable Unavailable Unavailable
Number of high-growth businesses in Quebec (by revenue) 2,620*** March 31, 2021 Unavailable Unavailable 2,620*
Revenue growth rate of firms supported by CED programs 6.0% March 31, 2021 6.4%* 12.3%* 4.7%*
Quebec communities are economically diversified Percentage of SMEs in Quebec that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous peoples, youth, visible minorities or persons with disabilities

Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by:

Women 17.0%

Indigenous peoples 0.8 %

Youth 17.5%

Visible minorities 5.0%

Persons with disabilities 0.2%

March 31, 2021 Unavailable Unavailable

Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by:

Women 16.2%*

Indigenous peoples 0.7%*

Youth 17.2%*

Visible minorities 4.5%*

Persons with disabilities 0.2%*

Percentage of professional, science and technology-related jobs in Quebec's economy 36.5% March 31, 2021 35.2%* 36.1%* 35.4%*
Amount leveraged per dollar invested by CED in community projects $2.20 March 31, 2021 $2.28**** $2.48**** $2.76
Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Quebec Value of R&D spending by businesses receiving CED program funding (in dollars)  $25M March 31, 2021 $25M $30M $36M
Percentage of businesses that collaborate with Quebec institutions of higher learning 19% March 31, 2021 Unavailable Unavailable 22.9%*

* Data for 2018-2019 corresponds to the most recent results published by Statistics Canada at the time this Departmental Plan was drafted. Figures for previous years are those that were available at this time, although Statistics Canada's actual reading of the results may be earlier; it is also possible that changes may have been made since the drafting of the Departmental Plan.

** At the time this was written, no data was available for this indicator. Statistics Canada is expected to eventually produce a satellite survey on clean technologies. As a result, we cannot set any targets for the moment.

*** Statistics Canada has changed the methodology it uses to measure the number of high-growth firms. The current target was established based on the new methodology and thus cannot be compared to the target in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan.

**** CED modified its Program Inventory on April 1, 2019; consequently, some projects were reclassified under the group of projects considered to be community-based. CED redid the calculations for each of the three fiscal years, which resulted in slight differences in the results for the 2016-17 and 2017-18 fiscal years presented in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan.

The methodology used to measure each of the departmental result indicators against the established target can be found on the CED website.

Financial and human resource and performance information for the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote ii.

Planned budgetary financial resources for the "Develop Quebec's economy" core responsibility
2020-21 budgetary spending (as indicated in the Main Estimates) 2020-21 planned spending 2021-22 planned spending 2022-23 planned spending
280,818,767 280,818,767 219,711,873 220,529,903
Planned human resources for the "Develop Quebec's economy" core responsibility
2020-21 planned full-time equivalents 2021-22 planned full-time equivalents 2022-23 planned full-time equivalents
184 180 180

The level of resources presented above represents a combination of grant and contribution funding and the operating budget funding required to develop and deliver programs, specifically via our 12 business offices located in the various regions of Quebec. The tables do not include resources for internal services to support the delivery of our programs.

Planned spending as of 2021-22 does not include the reinvestment of revenues stemming from our clients' contribution repayments because the authorizations had not been received when this Departmental Plan was being written.

Financial and human resource and performance information for the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote ii.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet the corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

Planning highlights

Modernization and optimization projects aimed at making our processes and approaches more agile and robust are being pursued in the business offices and at Head Office. The Horizon 2021 initiative is set to be pursued this fiscal year; it involves several projects in the three fields of transformation shown below.

People and Culture

Policies and Procedures

Tools and Technologies

A healthy, learning, innovative and diversified organization whose employees are networked, engaged and have the skills to contribute to the success of businesses and regions and a key partner in the achievements of the ISED portfolio.

Policies and parameters translating the government’s priorities into timely initiatives and tangible services to contribute to the success of businesses and regions.

Procedures in all areas of activity are clear, straight-forward and required for effective decision-making, client service excellence and the achievement of desired results.

Up-to-date tools and user friendly and high performance technologies which optimize our procedures and enable everyone – CED employees, partners and clients – to be informed, work/interact effectively and make the best decisions more quickly.

Specific projects and initiatives that will be continued in 2020-2021 include the following:

  1. The implementation of the digital strategy will maximize the contribution of technology and information management. Various digital transformation initiatives will be put in place to enhance the experience of clients that use the services provided by CED, and to facilitate internal operations, while placing a significant emphasis on data integrity and security. These initiatives include the start of the transition from our current financial system to SAP, the shared financial management solution.
  2. CED will also pursue the implementation of a new management solution for grant and contribution programs by using a new shared platform developed in co-operation with the other RDAs. Configuration and implementation work will continue, in order to modernize how we manage our grant and contribution projects and interact with our clients. This system puts our business clients' needs at the core of our actions. At the same time, we will pursue the review, modernization and streamlining of our business processes with a view to improving the client experience. The solution will be rolled out in 2020.
  3. The CED Innovation Incubator will continue to develop, through experimentation, new products and services that CED can integrate into its day-to-day activities to improve departmental performance and efficiency and the satisfaction of its clients and employees. For example, the Incubator will continue to work on improving the mobility of business office advisors, and their records management, in order to generate efficiencies and provide an enhanced client experience. In addition, the Incubator will pursue its efforts to simplify and digitize internal services for employees. The goal of this second project is to make internal services even more reliable, simple and fast, thus generating time and efficiency gains across the organization.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services
2020-21 budgetary spending (as indicated in the Main Estimates) 2020-21 planned spending 2021-22 planned spending 2022-23 planned spending
20,137,691 20,137,691 18,971,844 19,021,048
Planned human resources for Internal Services
2020-21 planned full-time equivalents 2021-22 planned full-time equivalents 2022-23 planned full-time equivalents
156 153 153

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department's planned spending and human resources for the next three fiscal years and compares planned spending for the coming year with actual spending in previous years.

Planned spending

Departmental spending from 2017-18 to 2022-23

The following chart illustrates actual and planned spending trends over the past three fiscal years and the next two fiscal years. The dark grey bars represent grant and contribution and operating expenditures. The pale grey bars represent statutory expenditures associated with the employee benefit plan.

Departmental spending from 2017-18 to 2022-23
Text version

The following chart illustrates actual and planned spending trends over the past three fiscal years and the next two fiscal years.

In 2017-2018, total spending amounted to $311 million, primarily due to funding for the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP 150 – Intakes I and II). This two-year initiative ended on March 31, 2018, which partially explains the reduction in appropriations as of 2018-2019.

Spending in 2019–2020 rose, compared with the two previous fiscal years, to almost $325 million. This increase can be attributed to initiatives such as the $26.2 million Steel and Aluminum Initiative, the goal of which is to support SMEs that use raw materials, and the implementation of the Canadian Experiences Fund, which has a budget of $11.5 million over two years.

One reason for the decline in spending from 2021–22 onward is that planned spending as of April 1, 2021, does not include the reinvestment of revenues stemming from our clients’ contribution repayments because the authorizations had not been received at the time this Departmental Plan was written.

Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars) The following tableshows actual, forecast and planned spending for CED’s core responsibility and for Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

In 2017-2018, total spending amounted to $311 million, primarily due to funding for the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP 150 - Intakes I and II). This two-year initiative ended on March 31, 2018, which partially explains the reduction in appropriations as of 2018-2019.

Spending in 2019-2020 rose, compared with the two previous fiscal years, to almost $325 million. This increase can be attributed to initiatives such as the $26.2 million Steel and Aluminum Initiative, the goal of which is to support SMEs that use raw materials, and the implementation of the Canadian Experiences Fund, which has a budget of $11.5 million over two years.

One reason for the decline in spending from 2021-22 onward is that planned spending as of April 1, 2021, does not include the reinvestment of revenues stemming from our clients' contribution repayments because the authorizations had not been received at the time this Departmental Plan was written.

Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table-shows actual, forecast and planned spending for CED's core responsibility and for Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2017-18 expenditures 2018-19 expenditures 2019-20 forecast spending 2020-21 budgetary spending (as indicated in the Main Estimates) 2020-21 planned spending 2021-22 planned spending 2022-23 planned spending
Develop Quebec's economy 291,790,589 273,397,927 304,101,298 280,818,767 280,818,767 219,711,873 220,529,903
Internal Services 19,638,153 19,738,917 20,780,841 20,137,691 20,137,691 18,971,844 19,021,048
Total 311,428,742 293,136,844 324,882,139 300,956,458 300,956,458 238,683,717 239,550,951

The drop in total spending in 2018-19 is primarily a result of the end of the CIP 150 initiative on March 31, 2018.

In 2018-19, new five-year funding was received for the Innovation and Skills Plan and the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy.

In the following year, additional funding was received for temporary or targeted initiatives. These include the Steel and Aluminum Initiative and the Canadian Experiences Fund.

Spending in 2020-2021 will be affected, among other things, by the end of the Steel and Aluminum Initiative on March 31, 2020.

The forecast drop in spending as of 2021-22 is largely a result of the fact that spending does not include the reinvestment of revenues from our clients' repayable contributions.

The share of funding allocated to Internal Services is expected to reach $20.8 million in 2019-20. This can be explained by current and upcoming major government-wide projects, including the new grant and contribution management system, the replacement of the current financial system, and the setting up of an innovation team that will work to improve the organization's performance.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for CED's core responsibility and for Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2017-18 actual full-time equivalents 2018-19 actual full-time equivalents 2019-20 forecast full-time equivalents 2020-21 planned full-time equivalents 2021-22 planned full-time equivalents 2022-23 planned full-time equivalents
Develop Quebec's economy 182 180 182 184 180 180
Internal Services 138 142 154 156 153 153
Total 320 322 336 340 333 333

CED is continually adjusting to the economic context, the needs of the regions and operational requirements stemming from various government priorities and initiatives, which explains workforce fluctuations from one year to the next.

Estimates by vote

Information on CED's organizational appropriations is available in the 2020-2021 Main EstimatesFootnote iii.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations

The condensed future-oriented statement of operations provides an overview of CED's operations for 2019–20 and 2020–21.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, is available on the CED website.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 forecast results 2020–21 planned results Difference (2020–21 planned results minus 2019–20 forecast results)
Total expensesFootnote 1 209,811,000 188,577,000 (21,234,000)
Total revenue 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 209,811,000 188,577,000 (21,234,000)

In 2020–21, total net spending is projected to be $188.6 million, down 10.1% year-over-year. This decrease in spending is primarily due to the end of the Steel and Aluminum Initiative in 2019–20.

A large part of CED's forecast expenditures involve transfer payments, i.e., non-repayable contributions and conditionally repayable contributions. Transfer payments are expected to total $140.2 million in 2020–2021, down 13.1% from 2019–2020.

CED's revenue, returned to the Consolidated Revenue Fund, is declared in its financial statements as having been earned on behalf of the government. As a result, the organization's total net revenue is zero. It should be noted that CED's total gross revenues are forecast to amount to $0.7 million in 2020–21, up $0.1 million from the 2019–20 fiscal year. The projected figure for 2020–21 represents the average of the organization's net revenue over the past three years.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

Institutional head: Mrs. Manon Brassard

Ministerial portfolio: Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Enabling instrument(s): Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act S.C. 2005, c. 26

Year of incorporation/commencement: 2005

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

The "Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do" section can be found on the CED website.

For more information about the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the mandate letter for the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages .

Operating context

Information regarding the operating context can be found on the CED website.

Reporting framework

CED's approved 2020–2021 Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory are shown below.

Departmental Results Framework Core responsibility: Develop Quebec’s economy Internal Services
Departmental Result: Quebec businesses are innovative and growing Indicator: Number of high-growth businesses in Quebec
Indicator: Value of Quebec goods’ exports (in dollars)
Indicator: Value of Quebec clean technologies’ exports (in dollars)
Indicator: Revenue growth rate of firms supported by CED programs
Departmental Result: Communities are economically diversified in Quebec Indicator: Percentage of SMEs in Quebec that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous peoples, youth, visible minorities or persons with disabilities
Indicator: Percentage of professional, science and technology-related jobs in Quebec’s economy
Indicator: Amount leverage per dollar invested by CED in community projects
Departmental Result: Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Quebec Indicator: Value of R&D spending by businesses receiving CED program funding (in dollars)
Indicator: Percentage of businesses that collaborate with Quebec institutions of higher learning
Program Inventory Program: Regional innovation
Program: Community vitality
Program: Targeted or temporary support

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information regarding planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the CED Program Inventory, can be found in the GC InfoBase.Footnote iv

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CED website.

Federal tax expenditures

CED's Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2020–2021.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance. Every year, Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections regarding tax expenditures in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote v This report provides detailed general information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address
800 René Lévesque Blvd. West, Suite 500
Montreal, Quebec
H3B 1X9

Phone number: 514-283-6412

Fax number: 514-283-3302

Website: www.dec-ced.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)

A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)

A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

A framework that consists of the department's core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)

The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn't. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2020–21 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)

Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

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